a personal vitality plan

October 9, 2013

Good morning! It has been a beautiful fall week here in the Midwest.

So, how are you doing in your personal vitality? Do you know? Do you know where you want to be in the different areas of your life? Do you know where you are now? Do you know how to get from where you are to where you want to be?

Someone pointed out once that we will spend more time planning a two week vacation than we will evaluating and planning our life. Additionally, Patrick Lencioni notes in his book The Three Big Questions for a Frantic Family, that high powered executives who are excellent planners and leaders fail to apply these same skills to leading their families.

Well, there are couple of good tools to help you in this area of your life. One is a personal vitality plan developed by Life Action Ministries. In fact, my oldest daughter, who still serves there, just finished her mandatory all-day review of her vitality plan this week. Life Action takes seriously the health of their staff thus they require every staff member to go through their vitality plan for a full day each year.

The approach is fairly simple. First, they have broken it down into 12 segments:

  1. Seeking God
  2. Marriage
  3. Family
  4. Relationships
  5. Emotional Health
  6. Physical Health
  7. Rest & Recreation
  8. Moral Purity
  9. Service
  10. Financial
  11. Work
  12. Other

Then there are four steps to take:

First – ask these three questions:

1. What has been going well?

2. What is being neglected?

3. What are some achievable steps I could take over the next year to replenish this (these) area(s)?

Second – Recognize that spiritual health requires community. Ask who is speaking into your life in these areas? If no one, then who needs to be part of the conversation? Who can be praying for you, advising you, and holding you accountable?

Third – once you have a big picture of what is going on in your life, select one or two areas to focus on for the next three months. Don’t try to do everything at once, just pick one to two areas.

Fourth – Revisit this exercise quarterly to track your progress and to set / adjust your goals.

The other tool I would recommend is Patrick Lencioni’s book I mentioned above. Click here to access some of the helpful tools he has designed to help with your family.

Being healthy is simply a choice – it is your choice. Now I do understand that simple does not equal easy – it is hard work to break old habits and build new ones, but these tools are a good way to start.

Seek health in all areas of your life and make a difference in this world,
BG