are we really thinking?

Are we really thinking? Are we doing any real deep thinking?

I too often find myself “too busy” to think deeply or I am too easily distracted. As someone on the tail end of the Baby Boomer generation, I am pre-Internet and have always enjoyed reading and reading deeply and then reflecting on that reading. I have now found that my heavy use of the internet and the use of social media has shortened my attention span. I am actively working to change that corrosive habit.

It makes me wonder how often we, as leaders, are making decisions based on habit, emotional reactions to whatever is the fad on social media, and without really thinking and reflecting on our thinking.

We are so busy doing that we seldom stop to think about the why behind our doing.

So, pause a bit and think and reflect. You will be better because of it.

BG

titles do not make leaders

He always had a smile playing around the corners of his mouth ready to burst into that full fledged humorous smile that made others around him smile in spite of themselves. He had a sparkle in his eyes and a jaunty spring to his step. He had a gift for seeing the humor in almost any situation and was quick to point it out.

He always had a kind word for people; always encouraging others and he seemed to know when you needed it the most. He was the kind of person that caused you to become better just by being around him.

He was optimistic about the future and was always “planting trees” for the next generation. He didn’t look back, but was always looking expectantly towards the horizon.

When I was first privileged to meet him, he was already well into his 70’s and had retired from his vocational job many years before. In his 70’s he was a “younger” and more optimistic person than most 20-year olds. He had endured much and walked with a limp due to a German machine-gun bullet that had gone through both of his legs.

We both sat on the governing body of a nonprofit as volunteers and had no formal authority as individuals. Many times our meetings got quite lively if you know what I mean. Yet when that gentle man quietly started to speak, all the noise, all the fuss stopped as everyone waited to hear what he had to say. Just a few quiet words of wisdom from that man changed the direction of many meetings – in a good way.

He was a man of integrity, a man of honor, a man of wisdom, who cared for people, who cared for the truth, was passionate about the mission, and was ever looking forward. He was a leader because of who he was, not because of any title.

I miss Mr. Al and I want to be like him when “I grow up”.

We Have a Crisis in Leadership—Or Do We?

“More is written about leadership than ever, but we have fewer real leaders.” I have heard this, or something similar, many times and I have often said it myself. We have seen failure after failure of high profile business, political, and other types of leaders in the news—both local and national. It gets downright depressing at times.

One thing that I have noticed is that many leadership failures come from what I refer to as “celebrity leaders.” Celebrity leaders have achieved fame as “leaders” through media infatuation, self-promotion, or because their company is unusually financially successful. Often when you dig a bit into these “great leaders” you find failed marriages, estranged children, toxic work environments, a “win at any cost” mentality that discounts the worth and dignity of people, and a litany of other things that I personally would not count as successes.

However, I have come to realize that I was looking in the wrong places for examples of good leadership. The best examples of leadership have been all around me—past and present. I remember my football coach who took a bunch of poor to mediocre athletes at a small school and turned them into a formidable team. I remember U.S. Army officers who quietly went about their business of leading well, though they did not fit the Hollywood version of military leaders. I know a couple in the Midwest who serve as community leaders working behind the scenes to help some of the poorest of the poor in a neighboring city. I remember an extraordinary woman at Texas Instruments (incidentally, she was from Mississippi) who tried not only to develop her team members but also to help them advance in the company—it was a delight being on her team.

Currently, I am working with a company whose leaders range in age from late 20s to mid-40s. They are quietly building a good business by taking care of their employees as if they were family members. They have had employees turn down offers for more money at other companies to stay because of the culture—because of the leadership.

I have worked at a company where the culture was so positive that executives took major pay cuts just to come and work in that environment. In towns and communities across this land, there are wonderful leaders making a real difference. You don’t see them on TV or on websites because these people are not concerned with fame or notoriety and they certainly don’t fit the Hollywood mold of leadership (thankfully!). You don’t see them being quoted on social media or posts about their “Top10 Secrets of Leadership” because they are unconcerned about social media and too busy getting something done to worry about the artificial worlds of Twitter, Facebook, or the like.

Discouraged about what you see in the media/social media about leadership? Then just stop for a bit and look around you and see the wonderful examples of everyday people performing acts of extraordinary leadership. You will be encouraged.

choose wisely

Photo by eberhard grossgasteiger on Unsplash

Whoever walks with the wise becomes wise, but the companion of fools will suffer harm.” – Proverbs 13:20 (ESV)

Choose wisely the people you spend time with as they shape you whether you are aware of that happening or not.

If you choose well, these people will help you become a better person. If you choose only people that don’t challenge you to be better, that don’t challenge you to set higher standards, that don’t speak truth to you – you will become something less and you definitely will not grow as a person.

Choose wise people that will speak truth to you so that you can grow and become even better.

Welcome Lauren Allen to the practice!

It is a great day today as we welcome Lauren Allen to the practice.

Lauren will be serving as the Operations Manager. She has years of experience in the area of Human Resources and customer service. She is also an excellent researcher which will enable us to better serve our clients.

So glad to have her as a part of the practice as we seek to Help Leaders Grow!

Independence Day – remember

Photo by Kevin Morris on Unsplash

Tomorrow, July 4th, we have the privilege of celebrating Independence Day.

Tomorrow, we are to celebrate and we are to remember that what we celebrate was purchased with great sacrifice. Our freedom is something we should never take for granted and we must be ever vigilant or it will gradually slip away.

Our family has been blessed to have had the honor of being a small part of earning and protecting that freedom beginning with a young lieutenant in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary war.

Freedom is precious and worth great sacrifice. http://bit.ly/2KMdziD

BG

Reflecting On & Learning from Your Day – A Framework

Photo by Ben White on Unsplash

We have all read and heard about the importance of taking time to reflect on our day so that we may learn from the day. However, some of us struggle to do so without some type of framework to guide us through that reflection in a productive manner.

Following are the highlights of a framework that many some of the leaders that I coach have found to be helpful and it is an adaptation of the Daily Examen.

“Some questions you might ask yourself:

  • From your perspective as a manager, what was the high point of the day?
  • The low point of the day”…Again, look for reasons and patterns.
  • When were you working at your best during the day?
  • When did you struggle to stay focused and engaged?
  • How hectic was the day?
  • Think about each of your direct reports. Imagine how he/she might have pictured interacting with you.
  • Look toward tomorrow.”

Go to http://bit.ly/2NgHEso to read the article and to see the model in full.

Hope it is a great day for you!

BG

A Critical Investment Strategy

Photo by Nick Morrison on Unsplash

Investing well is important as we consider and plan for the future. Most often when we think of investing, we are thinking of our financial investments. We are planning for our children’s college plans, their marriages, hedging against unexpected expenses, and for financial security for our latter years. However, our investment plans often do not consider the non-financial aspects of our lives and when we fail to invest in these areas, the financial investing becomes a moot point.

We are relational beings who are designed for and need strong relationships. The impact of good relationships on our mental, emotional, and even physical health has been well documented. As has often been stated, at the end of our time here on earth, it is not the number of hours we spent at the office or our impressive portfolio that we think about—it is the people in our lives. So, the question is, how is our “investment strategy” when it comes to the key relationships in our lives? Are you investing time and attention into your relationship with your spouse, your children, and your key friendships? Is it a high-quality investment?

What is your investment strategy when it comes to your spiritual, emotional, intellectual, and physical health? The importance of a strong financial investment strategy diminishes quite rapidly when we have invested poorly in these other areas of our lives. Do you have an investment strategy for growing spiritually and emotionally? Are you spending time daily in quiet reflection as well as reading in a way that grows you in these areas? Are you becoming a self-managed person where you manage your emotions versus them controlling you?

How are you investing in your intellectual growth? Are you reading well and often? Do you have a plan for how often you will read and what you will read? Are you reading widely and well beyond your profession? Are you consistently challenging your own thinking and correcting it when you find that your preconceived notions are incorrect or when you realize that your thinking patterns are unhealthy?

Finally, to my favorite part (not really)! How are you investing in your physical health? Do you eat in a way that strengthens you? A friend of mine often remarks that he eats to live versus lives to eat. So, are you eating to live and live well? What about that dreaded word—exercise? Do you exercise on a regular basis? I am not talking about becoming a gym rat, but is reasonable exercise a part of your daily routine?

Investing well in our overall life, not just the financial aspect, is vitally important. It is important to those we love, those we serve, those we lead, and to ourselves. Invest well so that you leave a legacy of hope and changed lives.

BG

humility in the workplace – a self-awareness issue

What does “humility in the workplace” mean? Why is it important?

For many, the word humility has many connotations. Some are very positive and some not so positive. It seems some people equate humility to weakness and being a “doormat”. I beg to differ from that view of humility. In true humility, there is great strength.

Regarding humility in the workplace, for me it means – An objective understanding, an awareness, of the strengths a person brings to an organization as well as an objective understanding, an awareness, of their gaps – their weaknesses or gaps in knowledge – thus an understanding of their need for others to be effective.

A proper understanding of humility results in an understanding of people’s need for others to be effective in their role in the organization (and life in general). That understanding should result in someone who greatly values collaboration and understands the need to be a good teammate at work.

Humility in the workplace is not weaknesses – it is a strength and wisdom.

Do you want to be more effective – try some humility at work (works at home as well!)

Have a great day!
BG

 

“Digital Disruption: Not Just for Millennials Anymore” by Daniel Burrus

“Being anticipatory can mean many things. In some cases, it’s about identifying opportunities for major disruptions that you yourself can introduce (think Uber, Kickstarter and other ideas that set entire industries on their ear.) But being anticipatory also means being aware of disruption from others that may impact you—and knowing how to prepare accordingly.

To that end, let’s consider the relationship between two important forces: digital disruption and the people in your organization.” Daniel Burrus  | http://bit.ly/2IPfYI9

This is an excellent article from Daniel Burrus. Things are changing and many people are excited about the possibilities.

Are you prepared as a leader for the changes? Are you reacting or are you anticipating and preparing to make the most of the changes that are happening and those that will come?

Hope it is a great day for you!

BG