Archives For Personal Management & Growth

Does it seem that in your personal and vocational life that it is a juggling act? We all fill so many different roles that sometimes it is hard to remember “which way is up”!

This article on the Harvard Business Review site has some good recommendations to help you “juggle”.

One of my favorite quotes is also in this article:

“The trick to juggling is determining which balls are made of rubber and which ones are made of glass.”

The bottom line is, do you know what your real priorities are in life and are you living and working in accordance with those priorities?

Dave Kraft is a wise man and was my former leadership coach. In an excellent post he talks about the application of ACTS in a particular situation and this post is a worthwhile read in my opinion.

So, let’s look at ACTS in a general sense and how a leader might apply it to their life.

A – ACCOUNTABLE: Are you truly accountable to someone(s) in your life? Truly accountable? Is someone willing to ask you the hard questions and pursue you until you deal with those questions? Are they willing to challenge questionable behaviors in your life?

C – CONFESSIONAL: Do you confess and own your sin or do you try to shift the blame? Mature leaders accept rebuke, confess their sin, and own their sin.

T – TEACHABLE: Are you teachable as a leader? Are you willing to receive honest inquiries from those you lead? And others? Do you realize that there are many people smarter than you and some of them are on the team you lead?

S – SUSTAINABLE: Is the pace you are setting for your team sustainable? Are your expectations realistic? Are you providing the resources to your team that they need to meet your expectations? What about your team’s work-life balance?

Here is how Dave applies ACTS:

1. Good and genuine accountability, coupled with vulnerability and transparency.
2. A clear value in keeping short accounts, with sin being quickly confessed and owned.
3. An attitude of being teachable and open to new ideas and ways of thinking.
4. A culture of pacing that is realistic and sustainable, resulting in good morale and joy.

Now, how can you apply ACTS in your life?

BG

Following is an excerpt from an excellent article on what is really happening when we think we’re multi-tasking. Check it out – it is worth your time to read in my opinion.

Our brains are busier than ever before. We’re assaulted with facts, pseudo facts, jibber-jabber, and rumour, all posing as information. Trying to figure out what you need to know and what you can ignore is exhausting. At the same time, we are all doing more. . . . Now we do most of those things ourselves. We are doing the jobs of 10 different people while still trying to keep up with our lives, our children and parents, our friends, our careers, our hobbies, and our favourite TV shows.”

“But there’s a fly in the ointment. Although we think we’re doing several things at once, multitasking, this is a powerful and diabolical illusion. Earl Miller, a neuroscientist at MIT and one of the world experts on divided attention, says that our brains are ‘not wired to multitask well… When people think they’re multitasking, they’re actually just switching from one task to another very rapidly. And every time they do, there’s a cognitive cost in doing so.”’So we’re not actually keeping a lot of balls in the air like an expert juggler; we’re more like a bad amateur plate spinner, frantically switching from one task to another, ignoring the one that is not right in front of us but worried it will come crashing down any minute. Even though we think we’re getting a lot done, ironically, multitasking makes us demonstrably less efficient.” (emphasis added)

Check out the rest of this excellent article Why the modern world is bad for your brain by  to better understand what is happening when we are trying to do what is called “multi-tasking”. It’s not good.

I came across this article on Inc.com and realized how accurate it was for me. The title of the article is, “7 Time-Wasting Habits You Need to Cut Out of Your Life for Good”.

The seven bad habits are:

  1. Checking email constantly.
  2. Waiting for things to be perfect.
  3. Multitasking.
  4. Inviting interruptions.
  5. Being disorganized.
  6. Failing to delegate.
  7. Never saying no.

Read the entire article as it is very worthwhile if you are interested in wasting less time as you pursue your calling in life.

BG

practice!

practice!J

So, what type are you? Personality type, that is.

I have enjoyed learning more about the different types of personalities and how we interact with one another. For example, I am an INTJ (see infographic and article below) and a DC on the DiSC assessment. Knowing that has helped me to become more self-aware and especially in regard to how I impact the people around me. That knowledge has also helped me to see what used to be blind spots in my life so that I can grow and become better. Knowing your “type” can also help you in your career choices.

Below is a link to a good article on Inc.com, “4 Major Personality Types & Ideal Careers for Each One [Infographic]
Are you a pragmatist or caretaker–and what does that mean for your career?”  by Larry Kim. Also below is the infographic from the article:

"Are you a pragmatist or caretaker--and what does that mean for your career?

“Are you a pragmatist or caretaker–and what does that mean for your career?

brick wall stock_photos-JayMatri-jaymantri-18Many of us often make presentations to educate or persuade others. Too often the idea or ideas we are trying to communicate are overshadowed by our incorrect use of the presentation software. When the software takes center stage instead of you or your idea, you have failed at your objective.

One of my favorite bloggers, Michael Hyatt, has some suggestions in his blog “5 RULES FOR MORE EFFECTIVE PRESENTATIONS”. His five rules are:

1. Don’t give your presentation software center stage.

2. Create a logical flow to your presentation.

3. Make your presentation readable.

4. Remember, less is more.

5. Distribute a handout.

Michael expands each point with some good suggestions and references to other presentation helps. If you use presentations in what you do, I would recommend reading his entire post by clicking here.

 

BG

Lauren - Blue sky over the REZAre you going more analog? I enjoy the use of technology, but I am finding myself moving back to a more “analog” world. I do enjoy reading a wide variety of blogs and learning from people the world over, but I am finding it more difficult to practice long-form reading. I also have found that while my e-reader is convenient, I actually do enjoy the feel of a book in my hands and the ability to mark up the book that I am reading.

While I really enjoy the ability to use Evernote for my electronic filing, I still prefer to actually write my notes and then scan them into Evernote for easy retrieval later (read Michael Hyatt’s post on note-taking here). Have you noticed the trend in music back to vinyl records?

I do like the advantages that is offered by the current technology, but there are some distinct advantages to going “analog”. Another consideration is the “hackabiity” of our data now. In fact Geoffry James of Inc. goes so far as to say,

By the time we have the “Internet of Things,” it will be so hackable and fragile that nobody will want to use it.

Mr. James goes on to list some trends where people are returning to a more analog world for certain high priority transactions. Are you seeing this trend?

What do you think of what Geoffrey has to say in his article (click here to read)? Should we be going more analog in some areas of life? Are we too exposed on the Internet?

From Michael Hyatt’s post:

Presentation software can be a wonderful tool if used correctly. It can also be a dangerous distraction that interferes with communication rather than facilitating it. The line between the two is thin. . .. Here are my five rules for making more effective presentations.

Click here to read his post!

Another great presentation resource is Nancy Duarte’s book Resonate!

Resonate

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