Archives For Strategic Planning & Execution

“The American workforce has more than 100 million full-time employees. One-third of those employees are what Gallup calls engaged at work. They love their jobs and make their organization and America better every day. At the other end, 16% of employees are actively disengaged—they are miserable in the workplace and destroy what the most engaged employees build. The remaining 51% of employees are not engaged—they’re just there.

“These figures indicate an American leadership philosophy that simply doesn’t work anymore.” (Clifton)

“After two decades of working with CEOs and their teams of senior executives, I’ve become absolutely convinced that the seminal difference between successful companies and mediocre or unsuccessful ones has little, if anything, to do with what they know or how smart they are; it has everything to do with how healthy they are.” (Lencioni)

“The most important decisions that executives make are people decisions.” (Drucker)

We have an organizational health problem in this country that is undermining the effectiveness of our organizations in both the for-profit and nonprofit worlds. The implications are far reaching in that it affects the overall health of this country economically, it affects the communities where organizations operate, and it affects the health of individual employees and their families.

The cause of the problem, and the solution, rests with those leading those organizations at the C-Suite and Board levels.

Many leaders of organizations have come through the business education system and are well schooled in the “hard science” aspects of running organizations. They know how to produce and read financial reports, develop strategic plans, manage supply chains, produce sales forecasts, ensure they are complying with human resources regulations, and all the other aspects of running an organization that are so important.

As important as good systems and processes are to a well-run organization, we have to embrace the fact that the health of the people in our organizations is more important than our strategies and systems. I once worked for an incredibly successful businessman who made the statement that there was no need for customer satisfaction surveys – what was needed was employee satisfaction surveys. His position was that if you have satisfied employees, you have satisfied customers. Put another way – if you take care of your employees, they will take care of your business.

Leaders have to learn to think differently about the people of their organizations realizing they are individuals with fears and hopes. It is up to us to take a deep look at our organizational culture and to start making the needed changes. Often it starts with looking in the mirror. It is up to us to first change our mindset.

It’s not really that complicated, but it is hard work. It begins with truly caring about the people in your organization. Do you see them as obstacles, means to an end, or as persons? Start with how you view others and go from there.

In summary is a quote attributed to Peter Drucker—“Culture eats strategy for breakfast.”

BG Allen
Executive Coach
Coachwell Inc.

Sources:
Clifton, Jim “State of the American Workplace Report” (p. 2). Gallup (2017)
Lencioni, Patrick M. The Advantage, Enhanced Edition: Why Organizational Health Trumps Everything Else In Business (pp. 8-9). Jossey-Bass. Kindle Edition
Peter Drucker, http://creativefollowership.com/the-most-important-decisions/

are plans useless?

April 30, 2014

Quotes and Various Formats.001

Good advice from GEN Eisenhower – his quote captures the reality that as soon as plans make “first contact” with reality, they immediately change and may quickly become irrelevant. However, a good planning process prepares you to deal more effectively with the unexpected obstacles or opportunities while still maintaining focus on your mission or objective. So, don’t be “married” to your plan, but do develop a robust and disciplined planning process that allows you to respond, and possibly even anticipate, the unexpected.

BG

Good morning!

One of the challenges with the term nonprofit (a legal tax designation) is that it communicates many things incorrectly and creates a certain stigma both within and without the organization. First of all “nonprofits” actually need to make a profit or they cease to exist, just like for-profits except it is usually a longer and more painful death.

Secondly, thinking like a “nonprofit”, especially ministry-based nonprofits, causes them to devalue good business practices as if they were somehow morally wrong. The result is that the “business” side is not done well which causes the ministry / service side to eventually implode.

Now, there is a new, and better, way in my opinion, of looking at “for-purpose” organizations. Following is a lead statement from an article on Forbes entitled, A New Nonprofit Model: Meet The Charitable Startups

Startup companies are traditionally for-profit enterprises, but in recent years philanthropic ventures have begun adopting the technological know-how and scrappy mentality of startups to develop a new breed of lean nonprofits.

Adam Braun, founder of Pencils of Promise who “refers to Pencils of Promise as a for-purpose organization rather than nonprofit, insists they remain focused on a bottom line – but instead of gross profit, its gross efficacy.” Braun believes that nonprofits can learn from big business.

Braun said. “Across both startups and the not-for-profit sector, people are driven by intense passion around purpose and mission – they’re there because they believe the company is doing something that wasn’t there before.”

“Entrepreneurs have a ludicrously large vision to change the world but have the humility to be solving very clear painpoints,” agreed Ted Gonder, founder of Moneythink, a nonprofit which teaches financial literacy to inner city students. “All these things are also true of nonprofits.”

So, if you lead a nonprofit maybe it is time to step back and change the way you think about how you operate. Is it time to start learning from startup businesses, learning from big business, and maybe partnering with for-profit organizations in more ways than simply asking for donations?

Maybe it’s time for a new way? Maybe “for purpose” organizations?

One last quote from the article that I think is worth all of us keeping in mind:

“Startups test new innovations and are always evolving – I think that that’s really, really important for any organization.”

Have a great week – I know our team has an exciting week ahead of us!

BG