Archives For Good_Questions

The Crisp Meeting is a great post by Seth Godin that gives you a framework for creating meetings that enhance your work instead of them becoming a drain on your productivity. Following is an excerpt from the post:

The crisp meeting is one of a series. It’s driven by purpose and intent. It’s guided by questions:

Who should be in the room?

What’s the advance preparation we ought to engage in? (at least an hour for every meeting that’s worth holding).

What’s the budget?

What’s the deadline?

The post has several more excellent questions to be asked in preparation for a meeting and some pithy thoughts as you might expect from Mr. Godin. It is worth a read in my opinion.

 

BG

Does this describe you?  Do you resonate with some of these statements?

“A year ago I knew I wasn’t happy. I felt the discontent deep inside me. It rattled my bones.

Just one year ago, I knew I wasn’t living a healthy life, I knew I wasn’t focused on my relationships like I should be, I knew I wasn’t pursuing my passions, I knew I wasn’t growing as an individual, I knew I wasn’t contributing to people like I should, I knew I wasn’t living a meaningful life.”

Click here to read the rest of the post on the Minimalists blog.  Some great questions.  Of course as a follower of Christ, a central part of the process is getting before the Lord about His calling on your life – not just our passions.

Maybe this is worth spending a day away to reflect on?

BG

We all want to improve and one of the best ways to improve is through good feedback from those we work with on a regular basis especially those that support us.  At times we may ask open ended questions such as “How am I doing?” which really don’t help very much.

Thomas DeLong writes in the Harvard Business Review blog about the SKS method.  It is simply these three questions:

  1. What should I stop doing?
  2. What should I keep doing?
  3. What should I start doing?

The SKS also counteracts our tendency to avoid seeking out other people’s opinions of our attitudes and behaviors. The SKS process breaks the hold our illusions have on us.

He also recommends using the following questions to help you identify the behaviors that are keeping you stuck and the behaviors that will help you move in new directions:

Stop

  • Are you hearing that you should quit doing something that you feel is a skill or strength?
  • Is your first response that quitting this behavior will have catastrophic consequences?
  • On reflection, is it possible that you’ve fallen into a behavioral rut? If you stop doing one thing, might you have an opportunity to try something new and different?

Keep

  • Is there something you’re doing right that people feel you should do more of?
  • Have you been dismissive of this particular behavior or skill for some reason?
  • What might happen if you used this “keep” more? How might it impact your effectiveness and satisfaction with your job?

Start

  • Are people recommending you do something that feels foreign or scary?
  • What about it makes you anxious? Is it because you are afraid of looking like you don’t know what you’re doing?
  • Why are people suggesting you start doing this new thing? What benefits do they feel will accrue to you, your group, or your organization?

Some good questions – click here to read the entire article.

Blessings on your weekend!
BG